A commentary on online delivery: Global Voices, Russia and the Panama Papers

By Laura Syvaniemi

Student ID 440582669

Näyttökuva 2016-04-05 kello 10.50.42

This piece posted by Tetyana Lokot on GlobalVoices.org as part of RuNet Echo, attempts an easily scannable and visually broken down style of delivery but loses its message amidst its Twitter screenshots.

Lokot breaks down her news post by screencapping tweets from a wide array of different sources, some verified Twitter accounts but most not. Hyperlinks to give context and authority to these sources would have made for more informative, engaging and trustworthy reading (Rohumaa & Bradshaw, 2011, p. 38).

Text boxes containing translations of the Russian tweets are necessary, however their visual delivery is cramped and out of proportion. The amount of boxes and visuals overwhelms the piece itself, reducing it to a commentary without a strong common thread. The piece could also do with some subheading to break down its different themes and sections for comprehensive reading and multiple entry points into the text (Rohumaa & Bradshaw, 2011, p. 37).

Social media sharing icons and choices to engage with the article and writer are provided and hyperlinks are provided well throughout the piece, except for the repetitive links to the Twitter hashtag #panamapapers where one would be sufficient.

 

Word count: 190

Reference:

Rohumaa, L., & Bradshaw, P. (2011). Writing for the web. In Online Journalism Handbook: Skills to survive and thrive in the digital age (pp. 29-46). Routledge.

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Improving Online Journalism: A BBC News Case Study

The news article I have examined is from BBC World News Online, “The Dark Side of South Korean Pop Music” published on 15th June 2011.

Screen Shot 2016-04-03 at 9.50.43 PM
Headline lacks word choice to benefit SEO

The word choice of the article headline could be improved to one that would assist in the SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) and one that is less ambiguous and generate more interest from an International audience (Rohumaa & Bradshaw. 2011:37). Another point for improvement is the font size and presentation of the headline that loses focal point from the distractions of the surrounding advertisements.

 

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The advertisement is the first thing in the reader’s line of sight, detracting attention from the article headline

Further improvements could be centered on downsizing the advertisements to be smaller and less distracting from the main news article.

Better use of spacing to avoid ‘chunks’ to help the reader easily read the information to focus on the main points of the article whilst they scroll through (Dorner. 2002:57). A ‘Key Points’ bullet-point section could help to downsize the mass of text (Dorner. 2002:72), such as:

  • What is K-Pop?
  • What are ‘Slave Contracts’?

Improved sub-headings to better gauge the content and lead the readers through the article, such as “information-carrying” words for SEO (Rohumaa & Bradshaw. 2011:36). Changes to font colour/size/Bolding/Italicisation would allow headings to be distinguishable from the main text.

Screen Shot 2016-04-03 at 9.52.01 PM
Sub-heading blends into the mass of text and does little guide the reading experience

The addition of tags/categories could offer easy online search ability for readers to find similar and related stories (Rohumaa & Bradshaw. 2011:36,38). The inclusion of a comments section could also assist in user engagement.

[Hannah Rae Ramos, SID: 312068735. Word count: 235]

References:

  • Dorner , J. (2002). ‘Good Web Writing’. In: Writing for the Internet. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Rohumaa, L. and Bradshaw, P. (2011) ‘Writing for the Web’. In: The Online Journalism Handbook: Skills to Survive and Thrive in the Digital Age. Routledge.