A commentary on online delivery: Global Voices, Russia and the Panama Papers

By Laura Syvaniemi

Student ID 440582669

Näyttökuva 2016-04-05 kello 10.50.42

This piece posted by Tetyana Lokot on GlobalVoices.org as part of RuNet Echo, attempts an easily scannable and visually broken down style of delivery but loses its message amidst its Twitter screenshots.

Lokot breaks down her news post by screencapping tweets from a wide array of different sources, some verified Twitter accounts but most not. Hyperlinks to give context and authority to these sources would have made for more informative, engaging and trustworthy reading (Rohumaa & Bradshaw, 2011, p. 38).

Text boxes containing translations of the Russian tweets are necessary, however their visual delivery is cramped and out of proportion. The amount of boxes and visuals overwhelms the piece itself, reducing it to a commentary without a strong common thread. The piece could also do with some subheading to break down its different themes and sections for comprehensive reading and multiple entry points into the text (Rohumaa & Bradshaw, 2011, p. 37).

Social media sharing icons and choices to engage with the article and writer are provided and hyperlinks are provided well throughout the piece, except for the repetitive links to the Twitter hashtag #panamapapers where one would be sufficient.

 

Word count: 190

Reference:

Rohumaa, L., & Bradshaw, P. (2011). Writing for the web. In Online Journalism Handbook: Skills to survive and thrive in the digital age (pp. 29-46). Routledge.

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Areas for improvement on an Upstart article

 

dont sugar coat stress
The text lacks visual appeal without sub-headings, bullet points and photos

After browsing through online articles on health, particularly on obesity, I came across an interesting story on ABC News Online entitled “Emotional eating fuelling Australia’s obesity epidemic, psychologist says”.

I found another article on Upstart that tackled the same topic with the headline, “Don’t sugarcoat stress”.

Although Upstart’s story has a catchier headline, it has several areas for improvement.

Scrolling the entire text is overwhelming since it looks lengthy and it does not have sub-headings to give readers an idea of what they are getting. Subheadings enhance the scannability of a webpage, because they give readers numerous entry points into the material (Rohumaa & Bradshaw, 2011, p. 37).

It would have also been better for Upstart to post key points about the article so that readers will have a gist of the story and its important parts. This can also enhance the audience’s recall of the story.

I also suggest pictures to be included in the article, to add to its visual appeal. Lastly, media-sharing buttons to other social networking sites will increase the article’s readership.

Despite the article’s areas for improvement, it still has good features. It is well tagged and a number of hyperlinks are available to lead readers to other sites which contain the story’s sources of information. . Hyperlinking allows multilinear or multisequential reading of text (Tapas, 2006, p.38). It also has interactive features wherein readers can comment on the article by leaving a reply below and they can also respond to the author via his twitter account which is hyperlinked on the page.

Name: Patricia Andrea Patena

Student ID: 460071754

Word Count: 258 words

References:

Rohumaa, L. and Bradshaw, P. (2011) ‘Writing for the Web’. In: The Online Journalism Handbook: Skills to Survive and Thrive in the Digital Age. Routledge.

Tapas, Ray (2006) Multimediality, Interactivity and Hypertextuality, in Online Journalism, New Delhi: Foundation Books.